Agenda item

Motions

The Council’s Constitution provides for a maximum of two hours for debate on motions.  At the end of the two hour period, those members who have already indicated their intention to speak on the motion being debated at that time will be allowed to speak, the mover of the motion will be asked to sum-up and the vote will be taken.

 

The following motions were received by the closing date of 7 May 2019. 

 

Motion 836 – Carbon action plan motion

Proposed by Cllr Iain Dobie

Seconded by Cllr Jeremy Hilton

 

This Council notes: 

  • That humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. 
  • That global temperatures have already increased by 1 degree Celsius from pre-industrial levels and atmospheric CO2 far exceeds levels deemed to be safe for humanity. 
  • The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5°C, published in January 2019, which tells us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities. 
  • That the world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. 
  • That the consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from happening must be humanity’s number one priority. 

 

This Council further notes that: 

  • Gloucestershire County Council recently appointed a Cabinet Member with specific responsibilities tied to climate change.
  • Gloucestershire County Council is on target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 60% by 2020/21 against its 2006/07 baseline. 
  • Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits 
  • Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency. 

 

This Council resolves to: 

  • Commit towards an 80 per cent reduction in the Council’s corporate carbon emissions no later than 2030, striving towards 100 per cent with carbon offsetting by the same date. 
  • To call on Central Government to provide additional powers and resources to support local and national action towards this 2030 target. 
  • Lobby national government to commit to 100 per cent carbon neutrality by 2045. 
  • Consider its contracts going forward to oblige all contractors to report their carbon emissions and to place a ‘carbon/environmental cost’ on competing bids. 
  • Do all in its power to adopt, implement and strengthen the Gloucestershire Sustainable Energy Strategy. 
  • Ensure that our major plans, such as the local transport plan, have clearly identified strategies to reduce carbon emissions. 
  • Work with district and borough councils to reduce the districts’ carbon footprint within their corporate strategies. 
  • Provide an annual report to the Environment Committee, with a performance update on a quarterly basis. 

 

 

Motion 837 – Parental leave for councillors

Proposed by Cllr Mark Hawthorne

Seconded by Cllr Carole Allaway-Martin

 

This Council notes:

·         The under-representation of women at all levels of politics

·         Nationally only 4% of councils have a policy on parental leave for councillors.

·         That, whilst proper parental leave is important to all parents, it has been particularly highlighted as an issue affecting women’s participation in local government.

 

Consequently this Council resolves to task the Constitution Committee to develop policies and, if necessary, constitutional amendments, to give councillors similar rights to parental and adoptive leave as members of staff.

 

 

Motion 838 – Gloucester Crown Court

Proposed by Cllr Jeremy Hilton

Seconded by Cllr Colin Hay

 

This Council notes that Gloucester Crown Court is a Grade II listed building, linked to Shire Hall, but that it is no longer fit for modern day criminal justice.

 

This Council agrees to write to the Justice Secretary at the Ministry of Justice

requesting that a new Crown Court, to handle criminal cases, is built to serve the county of Gloucestershire.

 

This Council also agrees that a new Crown Court could be part of a new 21st Century Justice Centre, which may also contain Magistrate and County Courts.

 

 

Motion 839 – Council Education Trust

Proposed by Cllr Lesley Williams

Seconded by Cllr Brian Oosthuysen

 

This Council recognises that every child in Gloucestershire deserves the best education possible.

 

This Council recognises that the County has some schools that do give children  an education that equips them for the best possible start in life. However this Council should also recognise that some schools do not meet the required standard to deliver a high quality education.

 

Gloucestershire County Council continues to play an important part in the education of all young people in the county.

 

This Council also recognises that it is Central Government’s intention that all schools should become academies or part of a multi-academy trust.

 

In preparation for any changes in status to schools in the County, to request that there is a thorough study which would provide an analysis, district by district, of the attainment and achievement of students attending schools in the county. Ideally this study would be done as a peer review.

 

Minutes:

Motion 836 – Carbon action plan motion

In proposing and seconding the motion, Cllr Iain Dobie and Cllr Jeremy Hilton accepted a friendly amendment from Cllr Rachel Smith (see highlighted text). 

 

This Council notes that:

·         Humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world.

·         Global temperatures have already increased by 1°C Celsius from pre-industrial levels and atmospheric CO2 far exceeds levels deemed to be safe for humanity.

·         The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5°C, published in January 2019, which tells us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities.

·         The world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050.

·         The consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from happening must be humanity’s number one priority.

 

This Council further notes that:

·         Gloucestershire County Council recently appointed a Cabinet Member with specific responsibilities tied to Climate change.

·         Gloucestershire County Council is on target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 60% by 2020/21 against its 2006/07 baseline. 

·         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits.

·         Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

·         The UK Parliament has recognised the climate emergency

·         The County Council has a leadership role, along with other public sector bodies, in reducing Carbon emissions across the whole county.

 

This Council resolves to:

·         Declare a climate emergency

  • Commit towards an 80 per cent reduction in the Council’s corporate emissions no later than 2030, striving towards 100 per cent with carbon offsetting by the same date. 
  • Call on Central Government to provide additional powers and resources to support local and national action towards this 2030 target.
  • Lobby the national government to commit to 100 per cent carbon neutrality by 2045.  
  • Consider its contracts going forward to oblige all contractors to report their carbon emissions and to place a ‘carbon / environmental cost’ on competing bids. 
  • Do all in its power to adopt, implement and strengthen the Gloucestershire Sustainable Energy Strategy. 
  • Ensure that our major plans, such as the local transport plan, have clearly identified strategies to reduce carbon emissions. 
  • Work with district and borough councils to reduce the districts’ carbon footprint within their corporate strategies. 
  • Provide an annual report to the environment committee, with a performance update on a quarterly basis. 

 

Cllr Dobie spoke passionately in support of the motion.  He stated that action needed to be taken now and urged that challenging and achievable targets be set to reduce carbon emissions.  He noted that average global temperatures had increased significantly and sea levels were rising.  The impact of doing nothing was obvious to everyone and an ambitious strategic approach was needed.  All of the Council’s existing aims and goals needed to be aligned with climate change ambitions.  Action could be taken in a range of areas including development planning, encouraging the supply of local produce and getting people out of their cars by improving cycling and public transport. He said that it was a climate change emergency and radical action was needed now.  The mantra should be ‘think global, act local’.

 

Cllr Hilton stated that the motion proposed a range of measures that were both practicable and achievable.  He believed that the Council could do more, particularly relating to the development of a solar farm, planting more trees and ensuring that contractors met the same standards as the Council.  He supported the idea of establishing a people’s assembly to take a range of initiatives forward.

 

Cllr Nigel Moor proposed and Cllr Mark Hawthorne seconded the following amendment (changes are shown in highlighted text).

 

This Council notes: 

·         That humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. 

·         That global temperatures have already increased by 1°C from pre-industrial levels and atmospheric CO2 far exceeds levels deemed to be safe for humanity. 

·         The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5°C, published in January 2019, which tells us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities. 

·         That the world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. 

·         That the consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from happening must be humanity’s number one priority. 

 

This Council further notes that: 

·         The UK is responsible for 1% of the world’s CO2 emissions, and whilst we have reduced those emissions more than any other developed country, this council notes that without global action we will not succeed.

·         New Zealand, France, Belgium, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden have all committed to zero carbon by 2050.

·         This is the recommended position of the independent Committee on Climate Change.

·        This is the position of Parliament, as first laid out by Alex Chalk MP, and later supported by Jeremy Corbyn MP in an opposition day debate last month.

·         Gloucestershire County Council recently appointed a Cabinet Member with specific responsibilities tied to climate change.

·         Gloucestershire County Council is on target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 60% by 2020/21 against its 2006/07 baseline. 

·         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits 

·         Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

·         The UK Parliament has recognised the climate emergency

·         The County Council has a leadership role, along with other public sector bodies, in reducing Carbon emissions across the whole County.

 

 This Council resolves to: 

·        This Council welcomes and endorses on behalf of Gloucestershire the declaration of a climate change emergency by parliament on behalf of the UK and urges other countries to do the same.

·        Commit towards an 80 per cent reduction in the Council`s corporate carbon emissions no later than 2030, striving towards 100 percent with carbon offsetting by the same date.

·        Commits the Council to following the scientific advice of the Committee on Climate Change, as advocated in parliament by Alex Chalk MP, and subsequently by Jeremy Corbyn MP, and deliver a carbon neutral county by 2050.

·        Call on Central Government to provide additional powers and resources to support local and national action towards this 2030 target. 

·        Lobby national government to commit to 100 per cent carbon neutrality by 2050.

·         Consider its contracts going forward to oblige all contractors to report their carbon emissions and to place a ‘carbon/environmental cost’ on competing bids. 

·         Do all in its power to adopt, implement and strengthen the Gloucestershire Sustainable Energy Strategy. 

·         Ensure that our major plans, such as the local transport plan, have clearly identified strategies to reduce carbon emissions. 

·         Work with district and borough councils to reduce the districts’ carbon footprint within their corporate strategies. 

·        Provide an annual report to the Environment Scrutiny Committee, with a performance update on a quarterly basis. 

 

Cllr Moor noted that the United States and China accounted for 40% of worldwide carbon emissions but he recognised that Gloucestershire needed to set an example.  He was pleased that the Council was holding a climate change summit on 21 May 2019 which would mark the start of consultation on a climate change strategy with robust and challenging targets.

 

Some members were not supportive of the amendment because they felt that it was watering down the intent of the original motion.  They paid tribute to the people who had brought climate change issues to public attention in recent weeks.  They were anxious that the Council sent out a clear message that it was serious about tackling climate change.  A 2°C warming, instead of 1.5°C, would result in the level of drought doubling and a further 10cm increase in sea level.  A number of the district councils in Gloucestershire had already declared a climate change emergency.

 

Other members spoke in support of the motion as they believed the targets were realistic and achievable.  They welcomed the climate change summit being organised by the Council on 21 May 2019.  They commended the steps that the Council had already taken but recognised that more action was required.  Environmentalists and Eco-scientists in the UK were helping to develop new technologies to reduce carbon emissions that could be used across the world.

 

A member expressed concern that 400 year old oak trees in the Forest of Dean were dying back as a result of climate change.  He called on Forestry England to take a more sympathetic approach to preserving ancient forests by cutting down fewer trees and concentrating their efforts on preserving existing trees.

 

Another member referred to ash dieback and he commended local landowners on the action they were taking to replant trees.

 

Members noted the importance of individuals and local communities taking action themselves.  Councillors had an important role as community leaders by engaging with local people and informing them of the seriousness of the situation.

 

A member referred to a recent actuarial report on the Gloucestershire Local Government Pension Fund which made reference to risks associated with climate change including crop failures and the spread of infectious diseases.  He said that targets for action were essential and it was important that the Council acted without delay.

 

Another member stated that climate change issues were not new and he referred to the Ecology Party publishing ‘Blueprint to Survive’ nearly 50 years ago.  He was supportive of the Council setting ambitious targets.

 

Cllr Hawthorne explained that the motion reflected a number of issues that needed to be addressed locally and nationally.  He recognised the need to declare a climate change emergency but noted that it was a global issue and every country in the world needed to be encouraged to play its part.

 

Following a short adjournment, Cllr Moor and Cllr Hawthorne agreed to accept the following amendment from Cllr Rachel Smith (changes are shown in highlighted text).

 

This Council notes: 

·         That humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. 

·         That global temperatures have already increased by 1°C from pre-industrial levels and atmospheric CO2 far exceeds levels deemed to be safe for humanity. 

·         The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5°C, published in January 2019, which tells us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities. 

·         That the world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. 

·         That the consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from happening must be humanity’s number one priority. 

 

This Council further notes that: 

·         The UK is responsible for 1% of the world’s CO2 emissions, and whilst we have reduced those emissions more than any other developed country, this council notes that without global action we will not succeed.

·         New Zealand, France, Belgium, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden have all committed to zero carbon by 2050.

·         This is the recommended position of the independent Committee on Climate Change.

·         This is the position of parliament, as first laid out by Alex Chalk MP, and later supported by Jeremy Corbyn MP in an opposition day debate last month.

·         The IPCC has acknowledged that we must immediately reduce the amount of carbon emissions by 2030.

·         Gloucestershire County Council recently appointed a Cabinet Member with specific responsibilities tied to climate change.

·         Gloucestershire County Council is on target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 60% by 2020/21 against its 2006/07 baseline. 

·         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits 

·         Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

 

·         The UK Parliament has recognised the climate emergency

·         The County Council has a leadership role, along with other public sector bodies, in reducing Carbon emissions across the whole county.

 

 This Council resolves to: 

·         This Council welcomes and endorses on behalf of Gloucestershire the declaration of a climate change emergency by parliament on behalf of the UK and urges other countries to do the same.

·         Commit towards an 80 per cent reduction in the Council`s corporate carbon emissions no later than 2030, striving towards 100 percent with carbon offsetting by the same date.

·         Commits the Council to following the scientific advice of the Committee on Climate Change, as advocated in parliament by Alex Chalk MP, and subsequently by Jeremy Corbyn MP, and deliver a carbon neutral county by 2050,  and work with partners to identify what measures would be needed to deliver a stepped target of 80% carbon reduction by 2030 to reflect the IPCC report on climate change.

·         Call on Central Government to provide additional powers and resources to support local and national action towards this 2030 target. 

·         Lobby national government to commit to 100 per cent carbon neutrality by 2050.

·         Consider its contracts going forward to oblige all contractors to report their carbon emissions and to place a ‘carbon/environmental cost’ on competing bids. 

·         Do all in its power to adopt, implement and strengthen the Gloucestershire Sustainable Energy Strategy. 

·         Ensure that our major plans, such as the local transport plan, have clearly identified strategies to reduce carbon emissions. 

·         Work with district and borough councils to reduce the districts’ carbon footprint within their corporate strategies. 

·         Provide an annual report to the Environment Committee, with a performance update on a quarterly basis to the relevant committees including details of the resources required to meet the Council’s 2030 carbon neutral target.

 

Cllr Rachel Smith welcomed support for the amended motion which recognised the need for urgent action to be taken not only at the County Council but across Gloucestershire.  She noted that reviews of the Local Transport Plan and the Strategic Economic Plan offered opportunities to shape the future.   She said that it was about protecting the county’s future and preparing residents and businesses.

 

A member believed that the Council should be using its influence to persuade companies to report on environmental and social issues.  He noted that the Church of England as a major investor had managed to influence Shell as a global company. 

 

Cllr Moor stated that the Council was already engaged in a number of activities to address climate change, and the consensus reached during the debate, would mean that the Council would be even more ambitious.  He said that following the climate change summit members would have the opportunity to be involved in developing a new climate change strategy. 

 

Cllr Dobie advised that it was important to take action locally while looking for opportunities to influence the national and global position.  He said that he supported the amended motion but he regretted that it was not even more ambitious.  Nevertheless he was confident that it would have profound impact.

 

The amended motion received unanimous support.

 

RESOLVED that this Council notes: 

·         That humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. 

·         That global temperatures have already increased by 1°C from pre-industrial levels and atmospheric CO2 far exceeds levels deemed to be safe for humanity. 

·         The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5°C, published in January 2019, which tells us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities. 

·         That the world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. 

·         That the consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from happening must be humanity’s number one priority. 

 

This Council further notes that: 

·         The UK is responsible for 1% of the world’s CO2 emissions, and whilst we have reduced those emissions more than any other developed country, this council notes that without global action we will not succeed.

·         New Zealand, France, Belgium, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden have all committed to zero carbon by 2050.

·         This is the recommended position of the independent Committee on Climate Change.

·         This is the position of parliament, as first laid out by Alex Chalk MP, and later supported by Jeremy Corbyn MP in an opposition day debate last month.

·         The IPCC has acknowledged that we must immediately reduce the amount of carbon emissions by 2030.

·         Gloucestershire County Council recently appointed a Cabinet Member with specific responsibilities tied to climate change.

·         Gloucestershire County Council is on target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 60% by 2020/21 against its 2006/07 baseline. 

·         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits 

·         Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

·         The UK Parliament has recognised the climate emergency

·         The County Council has a leadership role, along with other public sector bodies, in reducing Carbon emissions across the whole county.

 

 This Council resolves to: 

·         This Council welcomes and endorses on behalf of Gloucestershire the declaration of a climate change emergency by parliament on behalf of the UK and urges other countries to do the same.

·         Commit towards an 80 per cent reduction in the Council`s corporate carbon emissions no later than 2030, striving towards 100 percent with carbon offsetting by the same date.

·         Commits the Council to following the scientific advice of the Committee on Climate Change, as advocated in parliament by Alex Chalk MP, and subsequently by Jeremy Corbyn MP, and deliver a carbon neutral county by 2050,  and work with partners to identify what measures would be needed to deliver a stepped target of 80% carbon reduction by 2030 to reflect the IPCC report on climate change.

·         Call on Central Government to provide additional powers and resources to support local and national action towards this 2030 target. 

·         Lobby national government to commit to 100 per cent carbon neutrality by 2050.

·         Consider its contracts going forward to oblige all contractors to report their carbon emissions and to place a ‘carbon/environmental cost’ on competing bids. 

·         Do all in its power to adopt, implement and strengthen the Gloucestershire Sustainable Energy Strategy. 

·         Ensure that our major plans, such as the local transport plan, have clearly identified strategies to reduce carbon emissions. 

·         Work with district and borough councils to reduce the districts’ carbon footprint within their corporate strategies. 

Provide an annual report to the Environment Committee, with a performance update on a quarterly basis to the relevant committees including details of the resources required to meet the Council’s 2030 carbon neutral target.

 

 

Motion 837 – Parental leave for councillors

Cllr Mark Hawthorne proposed and Cllr Carole Allaway Martin seconded the motion included on the agenda.

 

Cllr Hawthorne stated that the motion was about shaping how the Council supported people getting into public life.  As a democracy, elected bodies such as the Council needed to reflect the make-up of local communities.  He recognised that there were often barriers which prevented people standing for public office.  He believed that small changes over time would result in the Council Chamber being more representative of the communities it represented.

 

Cllr Allaway Martin noted that there was no legal right for parental leave for people serving in public office but there were examples of introducing schemes on a voluntary basis. 

 

A member advised that the Labour Group on the Local Government Association had made recommendations around parental leave for councillors in 2016.  She was pleased that these had been adopted by the Local Government Association. 

 

Another member noted that the Council was establishing a Member Development Group following the scrutiny review and she hoped that part of the group’s remit would include finding ways to encourage people to stand for election.  The lack of representation of women was of particular concern.

 

A number of other issues were raised by members including support for women who were pregnant and grandparents, timing of meetings and the practical measures that could be put in place to cover case work.  It was noted that more detail would be presented to the Constitution Committee.

 

On being put to the vote, the motion received unanimous support.

 

RESOLVED that

 

This Council notes:

·         The under-representation of women at all levels of politics

·         Nationally only 4% of councils have a policy on parental leave for councillors.

·         Whilst proper parental leave is important to all parents, it has been particularly highlighted as an issue affecting women’s participation in local government.

 

Consequently this Council resolves to task the Constitution Committee to develop policies and, if necessary, constitutional amendments, to give councillors similar rights to parental and adoptive leave as members of staff.

 

Motion 838 – Gloucester Crown Court

 

In proposing and seconding the motion, Cllr Jeremy Hilton and Cllr Colin Hay accepted a friendly amendment (see highlighted text). 

 

This Council notes that Gloucester Crown Court is a Grade II listed building, linked to Shire Hall, but that it is no longer fit for modern day criminal justice.

 

This Council agrees to write to the Justice Secretary at the Ministry of Justice requesting that a new Crown Court, to handle criminal cases, is built to serve the county of Gloucestershire, or the refurbishment of existing facilities is explored.

This Council also agrees that a new Crown Court could be part of a new 21st Century Justice Centre, which may also contain Magistrate and County Courts.

 

Cllr Hilton stated that he had served as juror at Gloucester Crown Court in the last year and he had been shocked at the poor state of the building, its failure to meet the requirements of people with disabilities and the lack of modern facilities such as a secure dock. 

 

He said that the Police and Crime Commissioner had indicated that he would like to bring the Magistrates Court and Crown Court into one location.  He noted that the motion did not identify a preferred location for the new facility but he recognised the importance of good public transport access.  He believed that the Justice Secretary should be invited to visit Gloucestershire. 

 

Cllr Hay stated that a new court complex was required that incorporated video coverage for witnesses and people in custody, provided a more appropriate venue for the Family Court and kept families of victims and the accused apart.  He was concerned that the current facilities were so poor that if a strong case was not made for a new 21st Century court complex then there was a risk that it would be moved outside the county and people would have to travel much further to access court facilities.

 

Cllr Dave Norman, Cabinet Member for Public Protection, Parking and Libraries, said that Gloucester Crown Court was a striking Grade II listed building and was recognised across the county as the main centre for justice.  He recognised that the building needed to be upgraded with appropriate facilities for the modern legal system.  He commended the work that had been undertaken by Richard Graham, the MP for Gloucester, to highlight concerns and it seemed more likely that the Ministry of Justice would support refurbishing the current building rather than moving elsewhere.

 

Other members recognised the historical importance of Gloucester Crown Court and hoped that it could be retained as part of a heritage centre. They believed that a purpose-built facility might be more appropriate that refurbishing the existing building.  A member expressed serious concern at the lack of investment in the wider legal system.

 

In summing up, Cllr Hilton stated that refurbishment of the existing Crown Court would be a significant improvement but he felt that a new bespoke facility might be a better option.  He noted that the Council owned the freehold of the Crown Court building and could refurbish it sympathetically and use it for its own purposes.

 

On being put to the vote, the amended motion received unanimous support.

 

RESOLVED that

 

This Council notes that Gloucester Crown Court is a Grade II listed building, linked to Shire Hall, but that it is no longer fit for modern day criminal justice.

 

This Council agrees to write to the Justice Secretary at the Ministry of Justice requesting that a new Crown Court, to handle criminal cases, is built to serve the county of Gloucestershire, or the refurbishment of existing facilities is explored.

This Council also agrees that a new Crown Court could be part of a new 21st Century Justice Centre, which may also contain Magistrate and County Courts.

 

 

Motion 839 – Council Education Trust

The following motion proposed by Cllr Lesley Williams and seconded by Cllr Brian Oosthuysen was not considered as there was insufficient time within the two hour limit for motions. 

 

This Council recognises that every child in Gloucestershire deserves the best education possible.

 

This Council recognises that the County has some schools that do give children an education that equips them for the best possible start in life. However this Council should also recognise that some schools do not meet the required standard to deliver a high quality education.

Gloucestershire County Council continues to play an important part in the education of all young people in the county.

 

This Council also recognises that it is Central Government’s intention that all schools should become academies or part of a multi-academy trust.

 

In preparation for any changes in status to schools in the County, to request that there is a thorough study which would provide an analysis, district by district, of the attainment and achievement of students attending schools in the county. Ideally this study would be done as a peer review.